Seed bank response to prescribed fire in the central Appalachians
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Seed bank response to prescribed fire in the central Appalachians by Thomas M. Schuler

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Published by United States Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station, U.S. Forest Service, Publicaions Distribution [distributor in Newtown Square, PA, Delaware, OH .
Written in English


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Pre- and post-treatment seed-bank characteristics of woody species were compared after two prescribed fires in a mesic mixed-oak forest in the central Appalachians. Nineteen woody species were identified from soil samples. Mean species richness declined but evenness did not after prescribed burning. The seed bank was dominated by black birch, yellow-poplar, blackberry, grapevine and Hercules club before burning. Following burning, the median density of seed bank propagules declined by 45 percent. Black birch, yellow-poplar, and grapevine declined by 69, 56, and 40 percent, respectively. The results illustrate the importance of the seed bank as a robust source of non-oak regeneration in mixed-oak forests and of the potential effect of fire altering it.

Edition Notes

StatementThomas M. Schuler ... [et al.].
SeriesResearch paper NRS -- 9, Research paper NRS -- 9.
ContributionsUnited States. Forest Service. Northern Research Station
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSD387.F52 S44 2010, SD11 .A455495 no.9
The Physical Object
Pagination9 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24491879M
LC Control Number2009526442
OCLC/WorldCa608377638

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Prescribed fire can reduce the supply of viable seed of oak competitors such as black birch (Betula lenta L.), yellow-poplar, red maple, and grapevines (Vitis spp.) that occur in the seedbank, but. Seed bank response to prescribed fire in the central Appalachians 1 online resource (9 p.) (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Thomas M Schuler; United States. Forest Service. Northern Research Station. Pre- and post-treatment seed-bank characteristics of woody species were compared after two prescribed fires in a mesic mixed-oak forest in the central Appalachians. Nineteen woody species were identified from soil samples. Mean species richness declined but evenness did not after prescribed burning. We compared pre- and post-treatment seed bank characteristics of woody species after two prescribed fires in a mesic mixed-oak forest in the central Appalachians. Nineteen.

This study characterizes the seed bank prior to and immediately following dormant-season prescribed fire in mature, mixed-Quercus spp. (oak) forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Thirty samples from the litter/duff (LD) and the top 5 cm of the mineral soil (MS) were collected from five 5-ha burn units (6 plots per experimental unit) before and immediately after. ligible effects of a once-applied, low-intensity prescribed fire on the buried seed bank, the effects of a low-intensity prescribed fire management regime - one that involves repeated low intensity burns - on the buried seed bank are unknown and should be a focus of fu-ture studies across mixed-oak forests in the eastern US. Introduction. Tara L. Keyser, Tracy Roof, Jacquelyne L. Adams, Dean Simon and Gordon Warburton, Effects of Prescribed Fire on the Buried Seed Bank in Mixed-Hardwood Forests of the Southern Appalachian Mountains, Southeastern Naturalist, 11, 4, (), (). Thirty samples from the litter/duff (LD) and the top 5 cm of the mineral soil (MS) were collected from five 5-ha burn units (6 plots per experimental unit) before and immediately after low-intensity prescribed fires, where maximum fire temperatures varied from 79 to °C.

In a seed-bank study, viable P. rigida seeds were not present in pre-burn litter or mineral soil (Major, ), indicating that cones had opened and deposited viable seeds after the fire. However, most of these new germinants were not able to survive through the first year. 1. Introduction. Coincident with post-Pleistocene climate change and use of fire by native Americans, oak (Quercus)-dominated forests have been present throughout eastern North America for the p+ years (Delcourt et al., ).In the central Appalachians, decades of fire suppression and other ecological factors have favored the establishment of shade-tolerant species with a. Seed bank response to prescribed fire in the central Appalachians / Pre- and post-treatment seed-bank characteristics of woody species were compared after two prescribed fires in a mesic mixed-oak forest in the central Appalachians. Nineteen woody species were identified from soil samples. ligible effects of a once-applied, low-intensity prescribed fire on the buried seed bank, the effects of a low-intensity prescribed fire management regime—one that involves repeated low intensity burns—on the buried seed bank are unknown and should be a focus of fu-ture studies across mixed-oak forests in the eastern US. Introduction.